Join #IMadeDrupal9 at DrupalCon Amsterdam and remotely!

Join the team making Drupal 9 as part of the contribution events in person at DrupalCon Amsterdam and remotely! We'll be spending the last day of DrupalCon Amsterdam working on three things.

  1. Removing deprecated API use from Drupal 8 contributed projects to get them ready for Drupal 9.
  2. Updating core dependencies and removing deprecated APIs from Drupal 9 itself.
  3. Improve the tools and documentation that help people prepare for Drupal 9.

On October 31st, join on Slack even if you are there in person but definitely if you are remote. We'll meet in the #d9readiness channel on Drupal Slack. If you’re at Drupalcon Amsterdam, come to Europe 2 Forum!

To remove deprecated API use from contributed projects:

  1. Tools: Pull up the getting started info at https://tiny.cc/d9readiness and get set up with the drupal-check tool to check your code for deprecated API use.
  2. Help people who want to learn how to remove deprecated API use from projects, or remove some deprecated API use yourself! In minutes, you too could help make Drupal 9! Here are tips and tricks for the most common deprecated APIs: https://github.com/mglaman/drupal-check/wiki/Deprecation-Error-Solutions.
  3. Pick an issue: Check the list of issues tagged Drupal 9 compatibility + Amsterdam2019 (or use your own module!).
  4. If you're a module developer who would like to get a better chance to having your module reviewed / patched by a new contributor there, please create (or tag an existing) issue with the Drupal 9 compatibility + Amsterdam2019 tags!

To remove the deprecated APIs themselves, update dependencies in Drupal 9 or improve the deprecated API checking tools and documentation, please ask for specifics in the Slack channel or in person. The Drupal 9 tables will be easy to find!

You can also help spread the word by retweeting this:

1xINTERNET will even supply a limited amount of stickers to proudly present that you made a difference!

Thanks everyone for contributing to making Drupal 9!

Drupal 8.7.7+ will support extensions compatible with both Drupal 8 and 9!

Drupal 8.7.7 expected later this week is the first Drupal release to support extensions compatible with multiple major versions of Drupal. This is huge!

Drupal 9 is planned for June 3, 2020 and we are aiming to make the transition as smooth as possible. In fact we build Drupal 9 in Drupal 8 with API deprecations and optional support for new dependencies (Symfony 4.4 is getting very close, while Drupal 8.7.0 was already Twig 2 compatible). Extensions following these deprecations and making sure they are compatible with the updated dependencies could have codebases that are both compatible with Drupal 8 and 9 at the same time, meaning less support burden and earlier Drupal 9 compatibility. In March 48% of contributed projects on Drupal.org were already "Drupal 9 compatible" (as we could detect at the time), and that increased 54% by July (highfive!). These projects will now have one more thing to do, a one line info.yml file addition, to allow their existing codebase to also run on Drupal 9.

The core: 8.x key did not cut it anymore

Drupal 8 looks at extension .info.yml files and checks for the core: 8.x key to check if the extension can be used with Drupal 8. Unfortunately this was not adequate already due to API additions in Drupal 8 minor releases. You could not specify an extension was only compatible with Drupal 8.4+. People devised clever tricks with dependency on certain versions of the system module, but that was still limiting due to inability to depend on specific patch releases. In case your extension depended on a bugfix being present, you cannot set a dependency on Drupal 8.4.1+ in any way.

Introducing the core_version_requirement key

While solving this issue it became apparent that solving it with the existing core: 8.x key is going to cause backwards compatibility problems with existing Drupal 8 sites. The format of the value could not be changed without causing issues, so a new core_version_requirement key was introduced. This now allows to depend on major and minor versions of core as well as specify multiple version requirements even between multiple minor Drupal versions. For example if you would need a bugfix that is to be included in both Drupal 8.7.23 and 8.8.3 (imaginary future versions) but you wouldn't care for the minor version, then you would use the following, making your module incompatible with versions before the particular bugfix you need on both minor branches, as well as incompatible with all older Drupal 8 branches:

name: My Module
type: module
core_version_requirement: ~8.7.23 || ~8.8.3

Such precision was never possible before!

The new feature is made available in 8.7.7 to help prepare for Drupal 9, as this makes it possible to also declare Drupal 9 compatibility with the existing codebase you already have. Drupal 8.7.x will get security support up until the planned release of Drupal 9 on June 3, 2020. For extensions that only support Drupal 8.7.7 and later you can now exclusively use the core_version_requirement key. If the extension is also Drupal 9 compatible:

name: My Module
type: module
core_version_requirement: ^8.7.7 || ^9

For extensions that also support older versions, you should keep the core: key as well. The core_version_requirement key will be ignored by older Drupal versions, and new versions will validate that you specified non-conflicting requirements in the two keys (with regards to Drupal 8 support) so for extensions supporting older core versions, core_version_requirement also needs to be permissive, but could also allow compatibility with Drupal 9 too:

name: My Module
type: module
core: 8.x
core_version_requirement: ^8 || ^9

Read more about this change in the change notice. There is also work ongoing to support dependency metadata from composer.json to drive Drupal's dependency resolution as well. That will coexist with this simpler approach and will provide a more composer-native solution for those who already adopted composer for their extensions. In the meantime at least core_version_requirement will limit what Drupal would install while composer.json requirements will limit what composer will download. Because both Composer and Drupal use the term install, but those don't mean the same thing, here is a comparison chart:

  core: 8.x system module dependency core_version_requirement composer.json dependencies
Can be used from Drupal 8.0.0+ Drupal 8.0.0+ Drupal 8.7.7+ Drupal 8.0.0+
Allows minor version precision No Yes Yes Yes
Allows patch version precision No No Yes Yes
Allows multiple constraints No No Yes Yes
Limits composer install (download) No No No Yes
Limits Drupal 8 install Yes Yes Yes No, unless explicit support is added.
Allows Drupal 8 and 9 install with same codebase No No Yes No, unless explicit support is added.

What happens to Drupal.org project version numbers then?

So a 8.x-1.3 version of an extension on drupal.org may only be compatible with a subset of core, but that was already the case earlier. Now an 8.x-1.3 version of an extension on drupal.org may also be compatible with Drupal 9. How will this work? Drupal's composer integration already ignores the 8.x prefix from version numbers and only cares about the project specific version. Drupal core already only installs extensions where the core compatibility requirements are met regardless of which version number was the package you used to download (8.x modules may be only compatible with 8.4+ already). So the ultimate plan is to do away with the 8.x prefix in extension numbers entirely on drupal.org and support semantic versions for contributed extensions instead. In the short term, the Drupal.org project browser also needs to be updated to take the dependency metadata and use that to power compatibility filters, instead of merely using the version number prefix.

Prepare for Drupal 9: stop using drupal_set_message()!

I posted my analysis of top uses of deprecated code in Drupal contributed projects in May 2019 two months ago. There are some great news since then. First of all, Matt Glaman of Centarro implemented support for deprecation messages directly in reports, so we can analyse reports much better in terms of actionability. Second, Ryan Aslett at the Drupal Association implemented running all-contrib deprecation testing on drupalci.org (Drupal's official CI environment). While showing that data on projects themselves is in the works, I took the data to crunch some numbers again and the top deprecated API uses are largely the same as two months ago. However, we have full analysis of all deprecation messages and their fixability which gets us two powerful conclusions.

Stop using drupal_set_message() now!

If there is one thing you do for Drupal 9 compatibility, make it getting rid of using drupal_set_message(). As the API documentation for drupal_set_message() explains you should use the messenger service and invoke the addMessage() method on it.

Of the total of 23750 deprecated API use instances found in 7561 projects, 29% of them were instances of drupal_set_message(). So statistically speaking if you stop using this single function, you are already 29% on your way to Drupal 9 compatibility (likely more for most projects).

Dezső Biczó already built automated deprecation fixers covering drupal_set_message() and more, based on rector.

Figure visualising the data explained in the text.

76% of deprecated API use can already be resolved

On top of the 29% of drupal_set_message(), there is another 47% of various other API uses that can be fixed now. This means that those deprecated APIs were marked before Drupal 8.6.0 was released and are therefore in currently unsupported Drupal core versions. So stopping the use of them would still keep your code compatible with all currently supported Drupal core versions. In other words, as of today, drupal.org project maintainers can resolve three quarters of the outstanding code changes for Drupal 9 compatibility. Considering we are still ten months from before Drupal 9's planned release date, this is quite good news!

Upgrade Status is a nice visual tool to explicitly list all the errors in the projects you scan. It provides instructions on how to fix them and immediately fixable issues are highlighted.

Work with project maintainers

You are not a drupal.org project maintainer but want to help? Yay! Based on the above it may be tempting to run to the issue queue and submit issues for fixing all the things. Good plan! One thing to keep in mind though is to work with the maintainers of projects so your help benefits the project most effectively. Drupal.org project owners may specify Drupal 9 plan information that should help you engage with them the best way (use the right meta issue, know of their timeline plans, and so on). Check the project page of projects you are interested to be involved with to make sure you contribute the best way.

More to come

I think the data is super-interesting and I plan to do more with it, for example cross-referencing with project usage. Stay tuned for more information in the future. In the meantime all the source data is available for your mining as well.


Correction: An earlier version of this post said there were 43% additional fixable deprecations for a total of 72%. Thanks to Ryan Aslett for corrections, the correct numbers are 47% and 76% respectively. Images and text fixed.

Disclaimer: The data is based on the state of contributed projects on July 29, 2019 based on Drupal core's 8.8.x development branch on July 29, 2019. As contributed module maintainers commit fixes, the data will get better. As core introduces more deprecations (until Drupal 8.8.0-alpha1), the data could get worse. There may also be phpstan Drupal integration bugs or missing features, such as not finding uses of deprecated global constants yet. This is a snapshot as the tools and state of code on all sides evolve, the resulting data will be different.

First beta of Upgrade Status for Drupal 8 out with highly improved reporting, helps to best collaborate with project maintainers

On our way to Drupal 9 every site will need to take care of making updates to their custom code as well as updating their contributed projects. However this time, instead of needing to rewrite code, only smaller changes are needed. Most contributed modules will only need to deal with a couple changes. Collaborating with project maintainers is the best way to get to Drupal 9. The first beta of the Upgrade Status module alongside recent drupal.org changes focus on making this much easier.

Upgrade Status beta provides better insight into Drupal 9 readiness

Take the first beta of the Upgrade Status module and run it on your site. It will provide executive summaries of results about all scanned projects and lets you inspect each individually.

Custom and contributed projects are grouped and summarised separately. You should be able to do all needed changes to your custom code, while for contributed projects you should keep them up to date in your environment and work with the maintainers to get to Drupal 9. The later is facilitated by displaying available update information inline and by pulling the Drupal 9 plan information from drupal.org projects and displaying it directly on the page.

This is how the summary looks like after scanning a few projects:

Upgrade Status summary page after scanning several projects.

Digging deeper from the executive summary, you can review each error separately. The beta release now categorizes issues found to actionable (Fix now) and non-actionable (Fix later) categories with a Check manually category for items where it cannot decide based on available information. For custom projects, any deprecation is fixable that has replacements in your environment while for contributed projects supporting all core versions with security support the window is shifted by a year. Only deprecations from two or more releases earlier can be fixed (compared to the latest Drupal release) while keeping Drupal core support. So somewhat ironically, Upgrade Status itself has deprecated API uses that it cannot yet fix (alongside ones it could fix, but we have them for testing purposes specifically):

Upgrade Status project issue list categories

The module is able to catch some types of PHP fatal errors (unfortunately there are still some in projects that we need to figure out the best way to catch). The @deprecated annotation information guiding you on how to fix the issues found are also displayed thanks to lots of work by Matt Glaman.

Own a Drupal.org project? Direct contributors to help you the way you prefer!

If you own a Drupal.org project that has Drupal 8 code, you should specify your Drupal 9 plans. It is worth spending time to fill in this field to direct contributors to the best way you prefer them help you, so contributions can be a win-win for you and your users alike. Whether it is a META issue you plan to collect work or a specific time in the future you will start looking at Drupal 9 deprecations or a funding need to be able to move forward, letting the world know is important. This allows others to engage with you the way you prefer them to. Additionally to it being displayed in Upgrade Status's summary it is also displayed directly on your project page!

Go edit your project and find the Drupal 9 porting info field to fill in. Some suggestions are provided for typical scenarios:

Drupal 9 porting info field on a project

This will then be displayed on your project page alongside usage and security coverage information. For example, check it out on the Upgrade Status project page.

Thanks

Special thanks for dedicated contributors and testers of the Upgrade Status module who helped us get to beta, especially Karl Fritsche (bio.logis), Nancy Rackleff (ThinkShout), Tsegaselassie Tadesse (Axelerant), Bram Goffings (Nascom), Travis Clark (Worthington Libraries), Mats Blakstad (Globalbility), Tony Wilson (UNC Pembroke), Alex Pott (AcroMedia, Thunder), Charlie ChX Negyesi (Smartsheet), Meike Jung (hexabinær Kommunikation). Thanks to Neil Drumm (Drupal Association) and Angela Byron (Acquia) for collaboration on the Drupal 9 plan field.

State of Drupal 9 - May 2019 session recording

I created and shared an open source set of editable slides with plenty speaker notes titled "State of Drupal 9" early in May, based on my webinar with Dries and then the Drupal 9 parts of the DrupalCon Seattle Driesnote. I hope that we can bring this know-how to a lot of conferences, meetups and to companies so people are more aware of what is coming, what happens to Drupal 8 and 7, what's so great about Drupal 9 and what are the key tools involved.

Before I even presented the slideshow first, I already got improvement suggestions from people presenting it elsewhere. So the first time I got to present this session in Minsk, Belarus at the kind invitation of DrupalCamp Belarus organizers, it was already improved from when I first published it. I will keep updating the slides and present where I can in the coming months. Please, do it yourself too! Translate, shorten, lengthen, etc. to match your audience and timing needs, as long as the key messages get through. Be an important contributor to Drupal 9 this way!

Here is the recording from DrupalCamp Belarus: