Drupal

Drupal related posts by Gábor Hojtsy.

Filebrowser module seeking maintainer

Three months ago, I posted a request for people to take over some of my modules, so I can concentrate on supporting the set I am actively developing and using better, and the other modules get proper maintenance going forward from other fine folks in the community. Nearly all of the modules found their maintainers, but I am still searching for a new maintainer for filebrowser module.

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Helping your Drupal events succeed

DrupalCon Barcelona Photo by morten.dkAt DrupalCon Barcelona, I decided to volunteer to fix the "event organization and promotion problem" around Drupal. We had a great "next DrupalCon" BoF where we discussed a lot of bigger and smaller details, and it was decided that we should retain this knowledge. Robert Garrigos announced the BoF initially to hand over the knowledge they learned while organizing the event, so we needed to find a permanent place to write up these notes.

This was also a good opportunity for me to step a bit ahead from the "internationalization and localization guy" stereotype. Now that we are growing the Drupal system to support local and international communities of all sorts, we should improve our infrastructure to help our own communities grow and promote themselfs. That is the next step for world domination, I thought.

FrOSCon is on!

Drupal people in Sankt AugustinWith the support of the Drupal Association, I traveled to Bonn this Thursday and played the tourist around the city that day. I have been to Cologne yesterday (have seen fantastic sights in both cities), and we ended the day with a nice dinner with people here for the conference and guys from the local user group. See some of Morten's pictures which are already up.

We also ended up at our hotel for some night drinks, and I actually met with some of the nice people I know well from the PHP community (from my previous deeper involvement with the PHP project). It turned out that I switched from the Drupal guys table to the eZ Publish table (lots of people staying in the same hotel). All-in all everybody is very nice, we mixed up quite well.

The conference is also going well, although there are lots of German talks, which some of us can't understand unfortunately. But this means we are progressing with core patches in the meantime, so if you have some pet issues, be sure to continue work on them.

Again, thanks for the Drupal Association for sponsoring the event, I would not be able to make it without their support! And special thanks to Robert Douglass, who had a very good sense of flawlessly organizing the Drupal presence so far.

Managing your local Drupal installation with Git

Although Drupal itself provides a central CVS repository for the Drupal core code and contributed projects management, it is well known that people use other tools for their own purposes. There were several ocassions, when private Subversion repositories were used to develop new core functionality (such as Forms API or the multilanguage changes coming up in Drupal 6). Some people also like using BZR to manage their own changes easily.

A very detailed introduction hit my web browser today though, explaining how can you manage and even upgrade your Drupal installation (including contributed modules) using Git, even keeping local modifications.

It is well-known that Git is a distributed version control system that was created by Linus Torvalds to help with the development of Linux kernel. Distributed version control systems, such as Git, are contrasted with centralized version control systems, such as Subversion. Linux kernel development is characterized by hundreds of contributors and several dozens of development sub-projects, all spread out across the Internet. The repositories contain thousands of files and many thousands of revisions.

We show that Git is actually capable of handling much more lightweight problems, without any unnecessary overhead, with only half a dozen of commands to remember.

It is good to see people experimenting with stuff, not because I see Git would be a good fit for the community at large, due to the lack of good and easy tools around it, but because the community gets knowledge on how different tools compare, to use them more effectively. Especially now, when this year's Google Summer of Code sponsors Jakob Petsovits working on making the version control infrastructure system agnostic.