D8MI

Drupal 8 multilingual tidbits 17: content translation basics

Up to date as of October 29th, 2015.

In the introduction to content and configuration translation piece we discussed what is considered content in Drupal 8. This is a somewhat misleading term because custom blocks, custom menu items and even user entities (user profiles) are considered content in terms of their implementation.

Content is always stored as entities. The main difference between configuration and content entities is configuration is usually created on the backend (think views, vocabularies, etc.) while content is usually created on the frontend (think free tagging taxonomy terms, comments, blog posts). This is not a black and white differentiation but it helps think of the categories. The other key differentiator is content entities usually get to have configurable fields. You can add new fields to user profiles, taxonomy terms or comments. Again there are exceptions, for example custom menu items cannot get configurable fields in core. Finally, there are even content entities that will not be stored, in Drupal 8 contact form submissions are content entities that live only until they are sent via email. For this tidbit we are concerned for content entities that are stored and multilingual.

2014 in review from a multilingual Drupal perspective

Whew! 2014 was a fantastic year for the Drupal multilingual team. We had some great events with huge sprints, including but not limited to: Global Sprint Weekend, the amazing Drupal Dev Days Europe, NYC Camp, DrupalCon Austin, DrupalCon Amsterdam and BADCamp.

A fun fact about people on the multilingual team is that even though we usually turn out in big numbers at sprints, there are numerous great mentors among us, so we don't work on code that much at mentored sprints. We do a great job helping people get started and move into more serious core work though. Our most famous mentee this past year is 2014th Drupal 8 core contributor Holly Ross, Executive Director of the Drupal Association who contributed her first and second core patches fixing multilingual issues.

The Drupal 8 configuration schema cheat sheet

After over a month of concentrated work, Drupal 8 was ready today to finally flip the switch and enforce strict configuration schema adherence in all TestBase derived tests in core. See the announcement in the core group.

If you are a Drupal 8 contrib developer and provided some configuration schema earlier (or you integrate with an existing core system like blocks, views, fields, etc.) then your tests may now fail with configuration schema errors. Unless of course all your configuration schema is correct: #highfive for you then.

Otherwise I thought you'll have questions. There is of course the existing configuration schema documentation that I helped write. However if you are a visual person and want to get an understanding of the basics fast, I thought a cheat sheet would be a great tool. So sat down today and produced this one in the hopes it will help you all! Enjoy!

Please provide feedback for improvements in the comments, and I'll update the sheet as appropriate.

All the multilingual happenings at DrupalCon Amsterdam

DrupalCon Amsterdam is coming up in just a few weeks and it is full of opportunities to learn about and get all your questions answered when it comes to multilingual Drupal. What's better, you can get involved making things happen and learn from those implementing the features firsthand. Here are my picks:

Multilingual Drupal 8 site building and programming

  • There is no excuse to not attend some of the sprints at and around DrupalCon. Sprints start two days ahead of the start of the conference on Saturday the week before. And there are still sprints going on the Sunday after the conference. It is not just the last day of DrupalCon itself where you can get involved and make a difference. In fact the leads are actually focusing more on the sprint on the weekend days. Also the weekend sprints are in a really cool venue. The best way to learn is to do!
  • You are looking for more of a directed guide of Drupal 8 still with the possibility to do it all hands-on? Look no further than the Drupal 8 multilingual hands-on lab presented by Aimee Degnan of Hook42 and myself from Acquia. The schedule info is a bit misleading, this session spans two timeslots and lasts two hours. Bring your laptop with Drupal 8 freshly installed!
  • Dive deeper into the APIs of Drupal 8! Francesco Placella from Tag1 presents Multilingual Content in D8: a Highly Evolved Permutated API showing how to code with the new system. While not strictly multilingual, in Field API is dead. Long live Entity Field API! swentel, yched and amateescu show how the most essential content element storage system changed and this is full of multilingual support of course.

Multilingual Drupal 7 site building and programming

Moving localize.drupal.org forward

The localize.drupal.org site seriously needs people who care about it enough to devote time to maintaining and fixing bugs. I set up one more BoF to gather people interesting in the well-being of this site titled We love localize.drupal.org. We need to upgrade to Drupal 7, support the whole range of new Drupal 8 APIs, drastically improve performance and then get new features going.


These are all the multilingual pieces that I collected. There may still be more, BoF scheduling just started and I may have missed a session or two. Let us know in the comments what other great events happen around multilingual Drupal. See you in Amsterdam!

Drupal 8 multilingual tidbits 16: configuration translation development

Up to date as of October 29th, 2015.

We learned how configuration translation works on the conceptual level and through the Drupal 8 built-in user interfaces in the previous article of the series. In this article, we'll cover how can developers integrate with configuration translation.

Explaining the structure of configuration

We used your main site configuration file as an example in the previous article. Let's review that again (system.site.yml):

uuid: ''
name: ''
mail: ''
slogan: ''
page:
  403: ''
  404: ''
  front: /user/login
admin_compact_mode: false
weight_select_max: 100
langcode: en
default_langcode: en

There are clearly some translatable elements here. Which ones? Well, at least the site name and slogan would be. How would Drupal know though? There is nothing in this file to tell Drupal about that. There is also no code in handling this configuration that needs to deal with that. We wanted to introduce language support in the most transparent way. Instead Drupal supports a static description format to describe the structure of configuration, that we call configuration schema.